Handprints in the Digital Cave

There are now more than 150 million blogs on the internet. 150 million! That’s as if every second American is writing a blog; every single Russian is blogging in this imaginary measure, plus about another seven million.

The explosion seems to have come back in 2003, when, according to Technorati, there were just 100, 000 “web-logs.” Six months later there were a million. A year later there were more than four million. And on it has gone. Today, according to Blogging.com, more than half a million new blog posts go up everyday.

doozle photo
doozle photo

Why do bloggers blog? Well, it’s not for the money. I’ve written on numerous occasions in this blog about how the digital revolution has undermined the monetization of all manner of modern practices, whether it be medicine, or music or car mechanics. And writing, as we all know, is no different. Over the last year or so, I slightly revised several of my blog posts to submit them to Digital Journal, a Toronto-based online news service which prides itself on being  “a pioneer” in revenue-sharing with its contributors. I’ve submitted six articles thus far and seen them all published. My earnings to date: $4.14.

It ain’t a living. In fact, Blogging.com tells us that only eight per cent of bloggers make enough from their blogs to feed their family, and that more than 80% of bloggers never make as much as $100 from their blogging.

Lawrence Lessig, Harvard Law Professor and regular blogger since 2002, writes in his book Remix: Making Art and Commerce Thrive in a Hybrid Economy, that, “much of the time, I have no idea why I [blog].” He goes on to suggest that, when he blogs, it has to do with an “RW’ (ReWrite) ethic made possible by the internet, as opposed to the “RO” (Read Only) media ethic predating the internet. For Lessig, the introduction of the capacity to ‘comment’ was a critical juncture in the historical development of blogs, enabling an exchange between bloggers and their blog readers that, to this day, Lessig finds both captivating and “insanely difficult.”

I’d agree with Lessig that the interactive nature of blog writing is new and important and critical to the growth of blogging, but I’d also narrow the rationale down some. The final click in posting to a blog comes atop the ‘publish’ button. Now some may view that term as slightly pretentious, even a bit of braggadocio, but here’s the thing. It isn’t. That act of posting is very much an act of publishing, now that we live in a digital age. That post goes public, globally so, and likely forever. How often could that be said about a bit of writing ‘published’ in the traditional sense, on paper?

Sure that post is delivered into a sea of online content that likely and immediately floods it with unread information, but nevertheless that post now has a potential readership of billions, and its existence is essentially permanent. If that isn’t publishing, I don’t know what is.

I really don’t care much if any one reads my blog. As many of my friends and family members like to remind me, I suck at promoting my blog, and that’s because, like too many writers, I find the act of self-promotion uncomfortable. Neither do I expect to ever make any amount of money from this blog. I blog as a creative outlet, and in order to press my blackened hand against the wall of the digital cave. And I take comfort in knowing that the chances of my handprint surviving through the ages are far greater than all those of our ancestors who had to employ an actual cave wall, gritty and very soon again enveloped in darkness.

I suspect that there are now more people writing—and a good many of them writing well, if not brilliantly—than at any time in our history. And that is because of the opportunity to publish on the web. No more hidebound gatekeepers to circumvent. No more expensive and difficult distribution systems to navigate. Direct access to a broad audience, at basically no cost, and in a medium that in effect will never deteriorate.

More people writing—expressing themselves in a fully creative manner—than ever before. That’s a flipping wonderful thing.

One thought on “Handprints in the Digital Cave”

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