Just Like Yesterday

Meet the new boss.

  Same as the old boss.

from Won’t Get Fooled Again, by Pete Townshend

 

The guardians of the old media have found a brilliant way to exploit the denizens of the new. By dangling the carrot of access to television—a mature industry where recognition and revenue remain solidly in place—the executives who stand at the gates to TV can cause the multitudes who populate the online realm—an industry where revenue is dispersed very unevenly and recognition is highly fragmented—to work tirelessly to promote their exclusive brands. It’s perfect.

In recent times, those clever folks who control TV have evolved the method of the online competition in order to shamelessly advance their corporate brands. Offer those who create content for the web—especially of course those who operate within the social media arena—the chance to create for TV, and those creators will toil doggedly, nearly interminably on your behalf, and they will do so without a cent of actual remuneration, and on the slimmest of chances at success. How great is that?

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation has just concluded a nation-wide contest where 285 comedy creator-teams submitted video ‘teasers’ in pursuit of a single (although lucrative at $500,000) prize of the production of a half-hour TV special. The competition ran over ten weeks, and the teaser was only the beginning of the work demanded of these aspirants. Each week, in addition to the endless amount of online ‘sharing’ these teams were obliged to do—if they were to have any realistic expectation of prevailing in the contest—these teams had to produce a new video ‘mission’ on a specified theme (‘The Do Over,” “The Differentiator” etc.).

Likewise Telus, a corporation with a more regional territory (Alberta and BC), have just run the ‘Storyhive’ competition, where hundreds of applicants chased 15 grants of $10,000, leading finally to one winner gaining $50,000 toward the production of content for Optik TV, the television service owned by Telus.

It’s a truly prodigious amount of work done by talented people on the behalf of others for absolutely no monetary recompense. The competitions are won of course via online voting solicited by the contestants, and don’t think it’s anything like a democratic, one email address, one vote mechanism. No, visitors to the relevant site (where you must of course register) ‘earn’ votes by repeated visits, or, more germanely, online promotion of the corporate site. For CBC and Telus it’s win win win; for 99%+ of the contestants it’s lose lose lose. And, if it’s necessary to drive home the point of this losing game, in the Telus competition, in winnowing the pitched projects down to the final 15, there is not one iota of critical adjudication applied; it is entirely determined by online voting. In other words, at least until that first significant selective step, Telus does not care one whit about the actual creative quality of the submissions; they care only about the quantity of online visitation they are able to achieve.

Let me be very clear about my take on this process. It’s manipulative, exploitive, and vile. The folks behind it should be ashamed of themselves.

Tau Zero photo
Tau Zero photo

But, as with so many of the changes wrought by the digital revolution, neither is this obnoxious game about to go away. The television executives who have invented it have mined gold for themselves, and they could care less about the fact that almost all of the losing contestants have nothing good to say about them or their contest. Those losers are simple collateral damage in the winning war for online traffic, and thus advertising dollars.

It’s odd and slightly unsettling that (as described in a recent article in The New Yorker magazine) KingBach, a top star on Vine, an online video site where content episodes last a sum total of six seconds, dreams of making it on TV and in the movies, where fewer people will watch him.

Welcome to the new world of mass media, which looks altogether too much like the same old world. The ‘young adult’ demographic still watches far more TV than they do online video. YouTube will make less than $4 billion in advertising this year; CBS will earn more than $8 billion.

Pete Townsend’s prayers may well have been in vain.

Interstellar Dreams

In a recent article in Aeon magazine, Elon Musk tells us that he figures it will take about a million people to properly colonize Mars. He has in mind a design for a giant spaceship, the “Mars Colonial Transporter,” to facilitate the task.

8577726421_2a363387c1And lest you think that Mr. Musk is just another techno-geek keener with a shaky grip on reality, no. This is the guy who sold PayPal to eBay for $1.5 billion, then went on to successfully compete with corporate behemoth General Motors by designing and marketing the Tesla electric car. Currently he heads up SpaceX, a startup dedicated to said colonization of Mars, a company that has a contract with NASA to transport astronauts to the International Space Station. He’s the real deal.

Musk sees the colonization of the red planet as a stepping stone to exploration of the rest of our solar system, and ultimately interstellar space. He imagines the million colonists in place within a century, the first bunch taking up residence there around 2040.

As a species, we have been journeying out beyond the horizon for about as long as we’ve been mobile. Always willing, despite obvious dangers, to explore unknown territories, then ‘settle’ them, before allowing others to move on again, into the alien. This urge to migrate, to reconnoiter strange lands and then inhabit them is one of the true hallmarks of humankind. No other species has spread so far and wide on the planet, and done it with such aplomb.

And so, for us, outer space is of course “the next frontier.”

The obstacles this time are no less considerable than they were on terra firma. Mars once had an atmosphere; probably surface water too, but these days it’s a distinctly harsh environment; exposed to it you’d last less than 30 seconds. Colonist’s quarters there will be close, and extremely stress-inducing. It will be a bleak, constricted adventure, and very few will care to go, given that it’s a one-way ticket.

Getting there, however, is relatively easy, compared to interstellar space travel. The nearest star, called Alpha Centauri, is four light years away. Sounds encouraging—if we can even approach the speed of light the trip might take less than four years for the astronauts to arrive, if Einstein was right about speed shortening time. The problem is the energy needed for the journey; it seems it is physically impossible that the spaceship could carry enough onboard fuel. Scientists have imagined ‘solar sails’ which will capture the streaming energy of the sun, a solar wind, if you will. Then there’s the need for enough food for the trip, the immense psychological pressure of isolation lasting that long, the health problems that come with weightlessness, the difficulty of communication with home, exposure to hazardous radiation, and more. Again scientists have ideas to meet all these challenges, but they are highly theoretical. None of them are anywhere near practical realization.

And of course there is the possibility of robotic exploration of space, but that’s not the same is it. Where’s the adventure in that? No robot can ever be a hero, not without a lot of misplaced anthropomorphism.

No, for all intents and purposes, our days of exploration are over. There are no more truly wild places left upon Mother Earth, and our chances of sallying forth into outer space, at least for the very indefinite future, are essentially nil. As William Gibson has pointed out, no one will speak of ‘the twenty-second century’ the way we used to of the twenty-first.

It’s a necessary, perhaps mythic shift in consciousness with consequences yet to be determined. Obviously it behooves us to take good care of the planet, given that it’s the only abode any of us will ever have. But it also suggests that we should better appreciate the miraculous coincidence of life on ‘the pale blue dot.’ Just as interstellar travel may never happen, so too we may never discover life elsewhere in the universe.

This is it folks. We’re staying home tonight, and likely forever. Fate will find us where we are.